The KRACK attack - This week in cybersecurity

Too busy working to keep up with cybersecurity news this week? Here’s a round-up of the top stories from the cyberscape.

By: Anthony Gil

The KRACK attack - This week in cybersecurity

As our power grids get smarter, they're more vulnerable to attack

In a sprawling office building in south Wales, Kevin Jones simulates massive cyber attacks on power grids, factories and other vital parts of national infrastructure. It’s the only way of knowing whether these facilities will cope when the real attack comes, he says.

Mysterious cyber espionage campaign uses 'torpedo' lure to trick you into downloading malware

The 'Leviathan' threat group is regularly launching phishing and malware attacks in an effort to steal sensitive data. An espionage group is launching cyber attacks against organisations in the maritime and defence sectors in what's highly likely to be an effort to steal confidential information and research data.

ATM Malware Sold on Underground Markets for $5K

A recently discovered piece of malware targeting automated teller machines (ATM) is being sold on underground markets for $5,000, Kaspersky Lab reports.

Taiwan Bank Heist Linked to North Korean Hackers

A recent cyber-heist that targeted a bank in Taiwan has been linked by security researchers to an infamous threat group believed to be operating out of North Korea.

Severe flaw in WPA2 protocol leaves Wi-Fi traffic open to eavesdropping

Researchers have disclosed a serious weakness, KRACK,  in the WPA2 protocol that allows attackers within range of vulnerable device or access point to intercept passwords, e-mails, and other data presumed to be encrypted, and in some cases, to inject ransomware or other malicious content into a website a client is visiting.

Iphone iOS 11 QR code scanner provides 'backdoor' exploitable by criminals

Apple's new operating system for iPhones and iPads contains a Quick Response (QR)-scanning based 'backdoor' that could be used by criminals.

Google And Microsoft Hit By Massive 5-Year-Old Encryption Hole

It's just another manic Monday in the cybersecurity world. First there was KRACK, a vulnerability that allowed for snooping on almost anyone's Wi-Fi. Now there's the plainer-named ROCA -- another complex but dangerous weakness in widely used cryptography found in chips made by German company Infineon Technologies AG.




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